Tag Archives: health-childrens-health

beef & vegetable noodle stir-fry

We often hear that eating healthy, fresh foods is too expensive and that it’s much cheaper and easier to pick up fast food on the way home then to make a meal at home.

One of my goals is to dispel this myth. Eating healthy doesn’t mean slaving away at the stove or breaking the bank. What it does take is some planning ahead, a little creativity and a love for great food.

The next time I make a stir-fry I’ll be reviewing a wok set sent to me by CSN Stores. CSN Stores has everything from dishes to dining room tables. Look for the review and a new stir-fry recipe coming soon!

Here is a meal that is well-balanced, comes together quickly, tastes great and costs $10.20 for four servings! ($2.55/person)

Even better? The pasta and vegetables were organic and the beef passes the Whole Foods Meat Quality Standards.

Money-Saving Tip: Add frozen veggies to your grocery list! They won’t go bad, they are often cheaper and have just as many nutrients as fresh ones!

Beef & Vegetable Noodle Stir-Fry – 4 servings

  • 4 oz whole-grain spaghetti
  • 16 oz bag of frozen Chinese Stir Fry Vegetables
  • 8 oz skirt steak
  • 3 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 2 Tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 tsp sriracha (if desired)

Prepare the pasta as directed.

Heat large pan over medium heat. Coat with cooking spray. Add steak to pan and season with salt & pepper. Cook for about 3 minutes per side. Transfer to a cutting board to rest.

Meanwhile prepare the sauce. Mix together soy sauce, sesame oil and sriracha.

Add the frozen vegetables to pan and saute for about 6 minutes, until cooked through.

Turn off heat and add pasta and sauce to pan. Toss to combine. Slice steak into thin slices and serve over pasta.


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Filed under great meals, pasta, protein, Recipes, sriracha, Uncategorized, vegetables, whole foods, whole grains

ask the nutritionist: breakfast on the go

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Breakfast is often times the first meal that we neglect, whether we are trying to skip meals or would prefer to spend the extra time sleeping. But as we’ve been told since we were young, “breakfast is the most important meal of the day” and there really is some truth to that. We’ve been “fasting” all night and we need some energy to focus and perform our best, whether it be at school, work, or play.

When I was in high school, eating breakfast, was like, totally not important to me. I was focused on the essentials: finding the perfect Abercrombie & Fitch outfit and making sure my bangs were curled just so.  My mother being oh-so-wise would make fresh waffles for my brother and I, which if we couldn’t eat whilst getting ready for school, we could take along in the car with us. Very Pleasantville of her, don’t you think?

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Abercrombie & Fitch is no longer cool (I don’t think?), my bangs no longer need curling and I’ve fully embraced breakfast. My day just wouldn’t be the same without it, nor would you want to be in my presence if it was missed.  Here are some of my breakfast staples – I often eat my meals in courses- an egg at home first thing and then something a little more substantial at work. I prefer splitting my meals up a bit, but obviously everyone will have different preferences!

Normal Breakfast:

  • First Course: Coffee and Coconut Creamer
  • Second Course: An Organic Egg (fried or hard boiled)
  • Third Course: Oatmeal & Peanut Butter, Hemp or Sprouted Bagel or Smoothie

Oddly enough, I rarely find the need to switch up my breakfasts, I love having a combination of proteins, fats and carbs. On weekends at home the taster will often make some omelets or something a little more exciting! (ie. bacon) But if you like some variety, here are some other ideas:

  • Cedarlane’s ready-to-go omelette
  • hard boiled egg and slice of sprouted bread
  • fruit, bread and peanut butter/almond butter
  • greek yogurt, cereal and peanut butter/almond butter
  • smoothie: almond/coconut milk, juice, spinach, fruit, amazing grass and/or protein powder, flax seeds, chia seeds, etc.

Do you eat the same things for breakfast or do you have to switch it up?

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Filed under ask the nutritionist, coffee, eating local, eggs, fats, protein, Uncategorized, whole foods, whole grains

ask the nutritionist: buying bread

Choosing a loaf of bread in the endless bread aisle can be confusing and down-right overwhelming!

It doesn’t have to be though, with a few quick tips and key things to look for you can leave the store with a wholesome loaf of bread, without spending a ton of time!

  • 100% Whole Grain – look for the whole-grain stamp and check the ingredients, the first few ingredients should at least be whole-grain
  • No sugar or high fructose corn syrup (If a sweetener is in the bread, it should not be in the first 5 ingredients)
  • Each slice should have at least 2-3 grams of fiber and 2-3 grams of protein – the combination of protein and fiber will help fill you up
  • All-Natural or Organic is always a bonus – long ingredient lists with tons of preservatives is never a good thing

I generally stick with sprouted bread and my beloved hemp bagels which are often found in the freezer, depending on the store. (And baguettes made with white flour on special occasions 🙂 )

What kind of bread do you buy?

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Filed under ask the nutritionist, protein, whole foods, whole grains

Things are looking better…

…for school lunches. Between my work at Camp Endeavor and my passion for real, whole foods, I have always hoped that the quality of our school lunches would improve.

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And two women in California are making this happen. Kristin Richmond and Kristen Tobey started Revolution Foods, which began as a graduate school project and has turned into a school meal program that serves more than 40,000 lunches daily. There are fruits and vegetables at every meal, no artificial ingredients, no trans fats or HFCS and the milk and meat is hormone and antibiotic free. Whenever it is possible, organic and locally sourced ingredients are used.

An example of a meal? All-natural honey-glazed chicken with roasted potatoes and garlic braised collard greens.

Sounds good to me! I don’t think we give kids enough credit. They are willing to eat and try more foods than we think! But I think this program is definitely a step in the right direction. Read the full New York Times article here.

What do you think of school lunches?

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Filed under article, ask the nutritionist, eating local, vegetables

A Better Easter Basket

For those of you celebrating Easter this year or a variation of it here are some ideas that go beyond Peeps and Reese’s eggs.  photo by organicpixel
Hard Boiled Eggs – classic, protein-filled goodie
Green & Black Organic Chocolate Bars
Seeds to plant with your little one
Paints or coloring book to celebrate the new colors of Spring!

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The White House Garden

Alice Waters, the executive chef and owner of the famous Chez Panisse in Berkley, CA is certainly a pioneer in the local & organic food movement. Read what she has to say about food in the White House.

Read her interview from the New York Times.

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